Permanent Exhibitions

THE ERA OF LONGBOATS

Starting in July 2018

50ans_coulAn all new permanent exhibition showcasing more than 20 small traditional watercraft in the Museum’s collection will be presented in the Boathouse

SEA ROOTS

The Musée maritime du Québec proposes a permanent exhibition where the St. Lawrence is presented as an icon of Québecois identity. With the ebb and flow of tide and time, Quebecers have forged ties with the St. Lawrence – strong ties – genuine sea roots.

Racines de mer

The St. Lawrence is inescapable –  it is also vital, changing and merciless. The river impacts the lives of seafarers and river shore inhabitants.

Sea Roots traces these relationships with the river and showcases treasures. Unique artefacts from the Museum’s collection highlight Quebec’s maritime past in the 19th and 20th centuries. This inspiring exhibition includes tales of adventures and shipwrecks, stories by seafarers and souvenirs of navigators. Vibrantly authentic witness accounts reveal the people’s attachment to the St. Lawrence – reminiscences of a maritime heritage that draw attention to the importance of the river solidly anchored in the reality of Quebec.

As part of the permanent exhibition, the Museum wishes to present a form of intangible heritage through the presentation of a series of witness accounts by the wives of sailors, captains, pilots, seafarers and shore dwellers – all involved with the river.

Click below (in French only) :

Un fleuve qui se raconte

Une vie à bord

Des risques et périls

CAPITAINE J.E. BERNIER – 1852-1934

“Son and grandson of a sailor, ship’s apprentice at age 14, captain at 17 he sailed across the Atlantic 250 times before venturing into the almost unknown waters of the Far North.”

V-Bernier-6Photo: Musée maritime du Québec

“His era was that of the last great sailing ships, the exotic trade from Rio to Liverpool and Gibraltar, the bustling shipyards in Québec, discipline aboard ship and death lurking under every wave. (…) This brilliant sailor was greeted by princes. He christened islands, refloated ships, faced challenge upon challenge for pleasure rather than by obligation, acquired a wealth of knowledge, wrote regularly in his ship’s log, amassed a fortune and then spent it convincing his countrymen of the need to repatriate the North.” [translation] – Paul Terrien